102. Two Days Lost – Journal Entry 8th Sep 1982

Oh, dear! Two days lost. Was it the combination of red wine and oranges the night before that triggered an extremely severe headache and frequent vomiting? Waves of nausea and constant vomiting continued until midday on Monday, accompanied by intense throbbing head and eye pain.

Finally it has eased. I feel weak but need to tackle the jobs that have piled up. First some planning:

Wednesday jobs:  Programming 1B, Cost accounting, type tax papers, write letters to the Rocky Permanent Building Society and Shannon, post letters, clean bedroom, pick beans and prepare one of the family’s favourite dinners, Bavarian meatballs with tomato and bacon sauce and brown rice. Simple and nourishing.

Thursday’s jobs: Programming 1B, Methodology, letters to Mary and Max, prepare a talk, weed the garden, make bangers and mash and cheese tart for dinner.

10th September 1982

I am expecting a call from Mr Carpenter, who lives in Yeppoon, about woodworking courses at TAFE. I also spoke to Ken Sinclair about whether they run a typewriter mechanics course. He patiently explained that although they don’t have a typewriter mechanics course, he would be interested to explore the possibilities. He wanted to talk for quite a while.  From our conversation, I gathered that adult education courses are not going well, in fact he is quite short of ideas. I have thought for some time that there should be adult education in Emu Park and so has Edral Damrow. However, do others feel the same, and if so, what sorts of skills or knowledge would they want to acquire or access? 

Nancy Balsys has taught Batik in Emu Park and she intends to ask her friends what interests them, what they are doing and why, and what they think should happen. Nancy’s husband Ron offered to look after their children so she could attend an activity one night a week. She found a yoga class which she could attend casually; other courses went too long and expected regular attendance and commitment.

I would like to identify local snakes and spiders; being able to discern which are poisonous would mean I could avoid killing them unnecessarily in the garden and chook pens. I also want to learn how to service my typewriter, and would like to see discussion groups form for these types of skills training.

A tentative plan would be to ask Edral to organise a meeting of a few women to look at community learning groups. Possibly a Citizen’s Advisory Bureau? I need to find out what is going on in Emu Park, now and in the past five years. There may be resources that could be tapped from the local school. I wonder if the Progress Association might be interested to organise courses or to back a community newsletter?

14th September 1982

Today, after the breakfast dishes, I must attend to Johnny’s desk and clean the study. I still have the problem of white ants. Library books must be returned, bills paid and prezzie buying organised through Johnny. I will telephone Mr Carpenter on 391830 about woodworking courses and finish off the letter to Mary and Maxy.

Dinner was delicious: veal chops marinated in lemon juice with a drizzle of Marsala, accompanied by the delightful Sauce Messine, potatoes in a box, lettuce salad and carrots. Pudding of fresh mulberries in sugar, ice cream and cream was thoroughly enjoyed by all, as it usually is. With satisfyingly full bellies, everyone went off to different parts of the house.

I was guest speaker at the CWA annual general meeting and had to speak for fifteen minutes on litter. I could think of nothing more dull than litter, especially at an AGM! After a brief introduction, I used the search technique and elicited answers from those at the meeting using two questions: What do you think is the litter problem, and, what should be done about it? A lively discussion followed and one member told me she was highly amused at the way I had everyone contributing their ideas instead of coming up with the information myself. Another representative of the RSL and Rifle Club was pleasantly surprised. On his way to the meeting he had been wondering how the topic could possibly be interesting he told me. He even contributing some clever ideas of his own!

56. Letter From A Year Ago – Journal Entry 16th Jun 1979

I’m sitting outside the student cafeteria, trying to stay cool under a big umbrella. Today we have a minor test in preliminary maths, a course run by Johnny, which I started at the beginning of the year. With approximately one hour to go, I decided to reply to your letter. I’m reading an excellent book by Zimmer called Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilisation, however, I found it difficult to concentrate on.

The campus here is really beautiful as tertiary institution campuses go. A landscape expert was hired and within a couple of years, the garden improved out of sight. Large rocks, huge lumps of driftwood and two or three bleached tree trunks are arranged attractively with trees and flowering shrubs grouped in hillocks. Mind you, winter here is mild – about 15 degrees Celsius in the morning – and the gardens are so colourful, just about anything will grow in winter if you take the trouble to tend the plants, even daffodils.

To get back to the campus and the people milling around, I just like being in a learning environment. I suppose having stopped school so early could account for it. I could be an eternal student if circumstances would allow it. We shall see.

The course I’m doing is something designed for adults, it prepares one for entry to a maths degree or just for the pleasure of doing mathematics. It’s an excellent course that was designed in England with great results. Johnny introduced it here for the first time this year and three lecturers have put many hours of work into developing it for Australians. There are great notes and tapes to accompany the texts. The drop-out rate, however, among part-timers has been high as they just found it too hard. So that will be something for the Maths Department to think about.

In the course of my letters, I’ll try to convey the flavour of life here, though we’re rather prejudiced. We think life in Queensland is really “beaut” if you’re independent, handy and make your own life instead of hankering after the pleasures of a big city. One feels isolated here, one is isolated, but as long as there is mobility, trips south to catch up on news, new things, say once a year, life in Central Queensland can be very good. Sydney we loved, an unusual city with its ferries, gardens and swimming pools; Melbourne, Perth and Adelaide I don’t know and look forward to visiting them sometime in the future.

To get off the subject of Australia, I was wondering if you could look out for old recipe books on Indian cooking from the second-hand book stalls or friends. I have Veerasami’s cookbook. I don’t particularly want the latest books, unless you think them worth having. Ask Aunty Nora too, she may be able to pick up something.

Also I wonder if R would mind giving me recipes that the hotel uses – the kormas and biriyanis seem hard to reproduce here – actually any recipes of Indian cooking as I’m deeply interested. Last year I ran a course on basic Indian cooking and could have run a couple more this year if I hadn’t started this course.

I am also very interested in kolams. Aunty Nora sent me some pamphlets years ago and Jaya drew some kolams for me. If you are able to dig up information on them and any stories on Indian food, I’d be grateful.

The Travels of Marco Polo is useful to give you an idea of what life must have been long ago and yet one asks, has anything changed? Nilakanta Sastri’s History of South India gives one a glimmer. I deeply regret not learning much about Indian life and culture, especially when I am asked about certain customs and taboos. When we first came here we were dismayed at the barrenness of culture when compared to India and Southeast Asia. The streets here are empty, no drums are heard, there is very rarely a procession and the markets are missing…

When we returned from the Philippines, I appreciated the privacy, the having to “do for oneself”, the way of life, the freedom to take whatever job one wanted without worrying about loss of status. Mind you there are some silly people around but then you get them everywhere.

Blast it, the more I think about it, the more I’m attracted to going back to India to explore a few things, just to revel in its crowds, flower bazaars, trains, silks, dances and music… above all Kathakali, whole nights of Kathakali.

Gran keeps trying the local lotteries (it’s seven years since she left India) she’d like to go back for a visit, mainly to see the family.

Got to go.

KarenProfileCircle120Notes and Links

  • Found this draft letter from 1979 amongst notes and journals on loose-leaf papers dated 1980, so I have added this to the journal series with some of my mother’s hand-drawn kolams.
  • This journal entry is part of the My Mother’s Voice – Journal Series and based on the journals of my mother.
  • These posts are meant to be read in sequence and the Preamble post marks the beginning of the journal series. Refer to Archived on the Home page.